Steven Walling

From WikiPapers
Jump to: navigation, search

Steven Walling is an author.

Publications

Only those publications related to wikis are shown here.
Title Keyword(s) Published in Language DateThis property is a special property in this wiki. Abstract R C
Etiquette in Wikipedia: Weening New Editors into Productive Ones Wikipedia
Huggle
Newcomers
Vandalism
Wiki
Retention
WikiSym English August 2012 Currently, the greatest challenge faced by the Wikipedia community involves reversing the decline of active editors on the site – in other words, ensuring that the encyclopedia’s contributors remain sufficiently numerous to fill the roles that keep it relevant. Due to the natural drop-off of old contributors, newcomers must constantly be socialized, trained and retained. However recent research has shown the Wikipedia community is failing to retain a large proportion of productive new contributors and implicates Wikipedia’s semi-automated quality control mechanisms and their interactions with these newcomers as an exacerbating factor. This paper evaluates the effectiveness of minor changes to the normative warning messages sent to newcomers from one of the most prolific of these quality control tools (Huggle) in preserving their rate of contribution. The experimental results suggest that substantial gains in newcomer participation can be attained through inexpensive changes to the wording of the first normative message that new contributors receive. 0 1
Etiquette in Wikipedia: Weening new editors into productive ones Huggle
Newcomers
Retention
Vandalism
Wiki
Wikipedia
WikiSym 2012 English 2012 Currently, the greatest challenge faced by the Wikipedia community involves reversing the decline of active editors on the site - in other words, ensuring that the encyclopedia's contributors remain sufficiently numerous to fill the roles that keep it relevant. Due to the natural drop-off of old contributors, newcomers must constantly be socialized, trained and retained. However recent research has shown the Wikipedia community is failing to retain a large proportion of productive new contributors and implicates Wikipedia's semi-automated quality control mechanisms and their interactions with these newcomers as an exacerbating factor. This paper evaluates the effectiveness of minor changes to the normative warning messages sent to newcomers from one of the most prolific of these quality control tools (Huggle) in preserving their rate of contribution. The experimental results suggest that substantial gains in newcomer participation can be attained through inexpensive changes to the wording of the first normative message that new contributors receive. 0 1