Rebecca Reynolds

From WikiPapers
Jump to: navigation, search

Rebecca Reynolds is an author.

Publications

Only those publications related to wikis are shown here.
Title Keyword(s) Published in Language DateThis property is a special property in this wiki. Abstract R C
Formal and informal context factors as contributors to student engagement in a guided discovery-based program of game design learning Constructionism
Design-based research
Digital divide
Digital literacy
Educational technology
Evidence-based practice
Game design
Globaloria
Informal learning
Motivation
Self-efficacy
Wiki
Learning, Media and Technology English 2013 This paper explored informal (after-school) and formal (elective course in-school) learning contexts as contributors to middle-school student attitudinal changes in a guided discovery-based and blended e-learning program in which students designed web games and used social media and information resources for a full school year. Formality of the program context did not substantially influence attitude changes but did appear to influence learning outcomes. While intrinsic motivation did not change in the aggregate from pre- to post-program among students, positive changes in intrinsic motivation were found to be associated with engagement in almost all areas of student engagement in Globaloria, with several at-home engagement changes measured. This finding challenges critiques of discovery-based learning as being de-motivating. Lower parent education among students was associated with positive changes in self-efficacy for online research indicating that disadvantaged students may stand to benefit from programs like this one. The study offers support for the need to more definitively explicate instructional design and context factors in educational technology research when investigating influences upon learning outcomes. The study holds implications for designing effective digital literacy interventions, and contributes to theory in the learning sciences and socio-technical systems research. 0 0
Contrasts in student engagement, meaning-making, dislikes, and challenges in a discovery-based program of game design learning Blogs
Cognitive load
Community of practice
Constructionism
Design-based research
Digital divide
Digital literacy
Discovery-based learning
Game design
Globaloria
Information literacy
Productive failure
Project-based learning
Self-determination theory
Social learning system
Social media
West Virginia
Wiki
Educational Technology Research and Development English 2011 This implementation study explores middle school, high school and community college student experiences in Globaloria, an educational pilot program of game design offered in schools within the U. S. state of West Virginia, supported by a non-profit organization based in New York City called the World Wide Workshop Foundation. This study reports on student engagement, meaning making and critique of the program, in their own words. The study's data source was a mid-program student feedback survey implemented in Pilot Year 2 (2008/2009) of the 5 year design-based research initiative, in which the researchers posed a set of open-ended questions in an online survey questionnaire answered by 199 students. Responses were analyzed using inductive textual analysis. While the initial purpose for data collection was to elicit actionable program improvements as part of a design-based research process, several themes emergent in the data tie into recent debates in the education literature around discovery-based learning. In this paper, we draw linkages from the categories of findings that emerged in student feedback to this literature, and identify new scholarly research questions that can be addressed in the ongoing pilot, the investigation of which might contribute new empirical insights related to recent critiques of discovery based learning, self-determination theory, and the productive failure phenomenon. 0 0
Changes in middle school students' six contemporary learning abilities (6-CLAs) through project-based design of web-games and social media use Digital & information literacy
Games
Social media
Wiki
Proceedings of the ASIST Annual Meeting English 2010 This poster presents findings on student development of contemporary learning abilities among 14 middle school students enrolled in a year-long elective game design class. The study measures students' change in attitudes towards the activities in which they participate, through their responses to a self-report survey of frequency, motivation, and self-reported knowledge. T-test statistics were used to analyze pre- and post-program differences, resulting in several statistically significant increases. The program and its outcomes have implications for digital literacy learning interventions that can be implemented in formal and informal learning environments with youth. 0 0
Comparison of middle school, high school and community college students' wiki activity in Globaloria-West Virginia (pilot year-two) Computer-supported collaborative learning
Constructionism
Digital literacy
Game design
Globaloria
Serious games
Social media
Web 2.0
Wiki
WikiSym English 2009 Constructionist-learning researchers have long emphasized the epistemological value of programming games for learning and cognition. This study reports student experiences in a program of game design and Web 2.0 learning offered to disadvantaged West Virginia middle, high school and community college students. Specifically, the poster presents findings on the extent of student use of the Wiki for project management, teamwork and self-presentation of game design attributes, comparing results across 13 school pilot locations. Also presented are students' self-reported recommendations for possible improvements to the wiki. Results indicate that some locations were more active in their wiki use; the poster addresses location-specific implementation context factors that may have played a role in the variant results. 0 0