Pasquale Lops

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Pasquale Lops is an author.

Publications

Only those publications related to wikis are shown here.
Title Keyword(s) Published in Language DateThis property is a special property in this wiki. Abstract R C
A virtual player for "who Wants to Be a Millionaire?" based on Question Answering Lecture Notes in Computer Science English 2013 This work presents a virtual player for the quiz game "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?". The virtual player demands linguistic and common sense knowledge and adopts state-of-the-art Natural Language Processing and Question Answering technologies to answer the questions. Wikipedia articles and DBpedia triples are used as knowledge sources and the answers are ranked according to several lexical, syntactic and semantic criteria. Preliminary experiments carried out on the Italian version of the boardgame proves that the virtual player is able to challenge human players. 0 0
Leveraging encyclopedic knowledge for transparent and serendipitous user profiles Lecture Notes in Computer Science English 2013 The main contribution of this work is the comparison of different techniques for representing user preferences extracted by analyzing data gathered from social networks, with the aim of constructing more transparent (human-readable) and serendipitous user profiles. We compared two different user models representations: one based on keywords and one exploiting encyclopedic knowledge extracted from Wikipedia. A preliminary evaluation involving 51 Facebook and Twitter users has shown that the use of an encyclopedic-based representation better reflects user preferences, and helps to introduce new interesting topics. 0 0
Leveraging social media sources to generate personalized music playlists DBpedia
Music Recommendation
Personalization
Social Media
Lecture Notes in Business Information Processing English 2012 This paper presents MyMusic, a system that exploits social media sources for generating personalized music playlists. This work is based on the idea that information extracted from social networks, such as Facebook and Last.fm, might be effectively exploited for personalization tasks. Indeed, information related to music preferences of users can be easily gathered from social platforms and used to define a model of user interests. The use of social media is a very cheap and effective way to overcome the classical cold start problem of recommender systems. In this work we enriched social media-based playlists with new artists related to those the user already likes. Specifically, we compare two different enrichment techniques: the first leverages the knowledge stored on DBpedia, the structured version of Wikipedia, while the second is based on the content-based similarity between descriptions of artists. The final playlist is ranked and finally presented to the user that can listen to the songs and express her feedbacks. A prototype version of MyMusic was made available online in order to carry out a preliminary user study to evaluate the best enrichment strategy. The preliminary results encouraged keeping on this research. 0 0
Natat in cerebro: Intelligent information retrieval for "the Guillotine" language game CEUR Workshop Proceedings English 2010 This paper describes OTTHO (On the Tip of my THOught), a system designed for solving a language game, called Guillotine. The rule of the game is simple: the player observes five words, generally unrelated to each other, and in one minute she has to provide a sixth word, semantically connected to the others. The system performs retrieval from several knowledge sources, such as a dictionary, a set of proverbs, and Wikipedia to realize a knowledge infusion process. The main motivation for designing an artificial player for Guillotine is the challenge of providing the machine with the cultural and linguistic background knowledge which makes it similar to a human being, with the ability of interpreting natural language documents and reasoning on their content. Our feeling is that the approach presented in this work has a great potential for other more practical applications besides solving a language game. Copyright owned by the authors. 0 0
"Language Is the Skin of My Thought": Integrating Wikipedia and AI to Support a Guillotine Player Lecture Notes in Computer Science English 2009 This paper describes OTTHO (On the Tip of my THOught), a system designed for solving a language game, called Guillotine, which demands knowledge covering a broad range of topics, such as movies, politics, literature, history, proverbs, and popular culture. The rule of the game is simple: the player observes five words, generally unrelated to each other, and in one minute she has to provide a sixth word, semantically connected to the others. The system exploits several knowledge sources, such as a dictionary, a set of proverbs, and Wikipedia to realize a knowledge infusion process. The paper describes the process of modeling these sources and the reasoning mechanism to find the solution of the game. The main motivation for designing an artificial player for Guillotine is the challenge of providing the machine with the cultural and linguistic background knowledge which makes it similar to a human being, with the ability of interpreting natural language documents and reasoning on their content. Experiments carried out showed promising results. Our feeling is that the presented approach has a great potential for other more practical applications besides solving a language game. 0 0
Knowledge infusion into content-based recommender systems Content-based recommender systems
Open source knowledge
Spreading activation
RecSys'09 - Proceedings of the 3rd ACM Conference on Recommender Systems English 2009 Content-based recommender systems try to recommend items similar to those a given user has liked in the past. The basic process consists of matching up the attributes of a user profile, in which preferences and interests are stored, with the attributes of a content object (item). Common-sense and domain-specific knowledge may be useful to give some meaning to the content of items, thus helping to generate more informative features than "plain" attributes. The process of learning user profiles could also benefit from the infusion of exogenous knowledge or open source knowledge, with respect to the classical use of endogenous knowledge (extracted from the items themselves). The main contribution of this paper is a proposal for knowledge infusion into content-based recommender systems, which suggests a novel view of this type of systems, mostly oriented to content interpretation by way of the infused knowledge. The idea is to provide the system with the "linguistic" and "cultural" background knowledge that hopefully allows a more accurate content analysis than classic approaches based on words. A set of knowledge sources is modeled to create a memory of linguistic competencies and of more specific world "facts", that can be exploited to reason about content as well as to support the user profiling and recommendation processes. The modeled knowledge sources include a dictionary, Wikipedia, and content generated by users (i.e. tags provided on items), while the core of the reasoning component is a spreading activation algorithm. Copyright 2009 ACM. 0 0
OTTHO: On the tip of my THOught Lecture Notes in Computer Science English 2009 This paper describes OTTHO (On the Tip of my THOught), a system designed for solving a language game called Guillotine. The rule of the game is simple: the player observes five words, generally unrelated to each other, and in one minute she has to provide a sixth word, semantically connected to the others. The system exploits several knowledge sources, such as a dictionary, a set of proverbs, and Wikipedia to realize a knowledge infusion process. The main motivation for designing an artificial player for Guillotine is the challenge of providing the machine with the cultural and linguistic background knowledge which makes it similar to a human being, with the ability of interpreting natural language documents and reasoning on their content. Our feeling is that the approach presented in this work has a great potential for other more practical applications besides solving a language game. 0 0