Loren Terveen

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Loren Terveen is an author.

Publications

Only those publications related to wikis are shown here.
Title Keyword(s) Published in Language DateThis property is a special property in this wiki. Abstract R C
Snuggle: Designing for efficient socialization and ideological critique H.5.2. Information Interfaces and Presentation: Graphical user interfaces (GUI) Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings English 2014 Wikipedia, the encyclopedia "anyone can edit", has become increasingly less so. Recent academic research and popular discourse illustrates the often aggressive ways newcomers are treated by veteran Wikipedians. These are complex sociotechnical issues, bound up in infrastructures based on problematic ideologies. In response, we worked with a coalition of Wikipedians to design, develop, and deploy Snuggle, a new user interface that served two critical functions: Making the work of newcomer socialization more effective, and bringing visibility to instances in which Wikipedians current practice of gatekeeping socialization breaks down. Snuggle supports positive socialization by helping mentors quickly find newcomers whose good-faith mistakes were reverted as damage. Snuggle also supports ideological critique and reflection by bringing visibility to the consequences of viewing newcomers through a lens of suspiciousness. 0 0
Geowiki + Route analysis = Improved transportation planning Geographic wikis
Route analysis
Transportation planning
English 2013 This poster describes the design of a novel route analysis tool based on a community-driven, geographic wiki to assist transportation planners to make better decisions. We highlight the advantages of our tool over other, similar ones-gained due to the use of a wiki-based platform-through a real-life usage scenario. Copyright © 2012 by the Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. (ACM). 0 0
"How should I go from-to-without getting killed?" Motivation and benefits in open collaboration Benefits
Consumer
Contributor
Geowiki
Motivation
Open content
Wiki
WikiSym 2011 Conference Proceedings - 7th Annual International Symposium on Wikis and Open Collaboration English 2011 Many people rely on open collaboration projects to run their computer (Linux), browse the web (Mozilla Firefox), and get information (Wikipedia). While these projects are successful, many such efforts suffer from lack of participation. Understanding what motivates users to participate and the benefits they perceive from their participation can help address this problem. We examined these issues through a survey of contributors and information consumers in the Cyclopath geographic wiki. We analyzed subject responses to identify a number of key motives and perceived benefits. Based on these results, we articulate several general techniques to encourage more and new forms of participation in open collaboration communities. Some of these techniques have the potential to engage information consumers more deeply and productively in the life of open collaboration communities. 0 0
WP:Clubhouse? An Exploration of Wikipedia’s Gender Imbalance Wikipedia
Collaboration
Gender gap
Content coverage
WikiSym’11 conference 2011 . 0 2
WP:clubhouse? An exploration of Wikipedia's gender imbalance Collaboration
Content coverage
Gender gap
Wikipedia
WikiSym 2011 Conference Proceedings - 7th Annual International Symposium on Wikis and Open Collaboration English 2011 Wikipedia has rapidly become an invaluable destination for millions of information-seeking users. However, media reports suggest an important challenge: only a small fraction of Wikipedia's legion of volunteer editors are female. In the current work, we present a scientific exploration of the gender imbalance in the English Wikipedia's population of editors. We look at the nature of the imbalance itself, its effects on the quality of the encyclopedia, and several conflict-related factors that may be contributing to the gender gap. Our findings confirm the presence of a large gender gap among editors and a corresponding gender-oriented disparity in the content of Wikipedia's articles. Further, we find evidence hinting at a culture that may be resistant to female participation. 0 1
WP:clubhouse?: an exploration of Wikipedia's gender imbalance Wikipedia
Collaboration
Content coverage
Gender gap
WikiSym English 2011 0 1
Wiki grows up: Arbitrary data models, access control, and beyond Access control
Data models
Geographic wikis
Geowikis
Wiki
WikiSym 2011 Conference Proceedings - 7th Annual International Symposium on Wikis and Open Collaboration English 2011 Ward Cunningham's vision for the wiki was that it would be "the simplest online database that could possibly work". We consider here a common manifestation of simplicity: the assumption that the objects in a wiki that can be edited (e.g., Wikipedia articles) are relatively independent. As wiki applications in new domains emerge, however, this assumption is no longer tenable. In wikis where the objects of interest are highly interdependent (e.g., geographic wikis), fundamental concepts like the revision and undoing must be refined. This is particularly so when fine-grained access control is required (as in enterprise wikis or wikis to support collaboration between citizens and government officials). We explore these issues in the context of the Cyclopath geowiki and present solutions that we have designed and have implemented or are implementing. 0 1
Wiki grows up: arbitrary data models, access control, and beyond Access control
Data models
Geographic wikis
Geowikis
Wiki
WikiSym English 2011 0 1
Bumpy, caution with merging: An exploration of tagging in a geowiki Bicycling
Geowikis
Online community
Tags
Wiki
Proceedings of the 16th ACM International Conference on Supporting Group Work, GROUP'10 English 2010 We introduced tags into the Cyclopath geographic wiki for bicyclists. To promote the creation of useful tags, we made tags wiki objects, giving ownership of tag applications to the community, not to individuals. We also introduced a novel interface that lets users fine-tune their routing preferences with tags. We analyzed the Cyclopath tagging vocabulary, the relationship of tags to existing annotation techniques (notes and ratings), and the roles users take on with respect to tagging, notes, and ratings. Our findings are: two distinct tagging vocabularies have emerged, one around each of the two main types of geographic objects in Cyclopath; tags and notes have overlapping content but serve distinct purposes; users employ both ratings and tags to express their route-finding preferences, and use of the two techniques is moderately correlated; and users are highly specialized in their use of tags and notes. These findings suggest new design opportunities, including semi-automated methods to infer new annotations in a geographic context. 0 0
Eliciting and focusing geographic volunteer work Geographic volunteer work
Geowiki
Open content
Volunteered geographic information
Wiki
English 2010 Open content communities such as wikis derive their value from the work done by users. However, a key challenge is to elicit work that is sufficient and focused where needed. We address this challenge in a geographic open content community, the Cyclopath bicycle route finding system. We devised two techniques to elicit and focus user work, one using familiarity to direct work opportunities and another visually highlighting them. We conducted a field experiment, finding that (a) the techniques succeeded in eliciting user work, (b) the distribution of work across users was highly unequal, and (c) user work benefitted the community (reducing the length of the average computed route by 1 kilometer). Copyright 2010 ACM. 0 0
Lurking? Cyclopaths? A quantitative lifecycle analysis of user behavior in a geowiki Geographic volunteer work
Geowiki
Lurking
Open content
Volunteered geographic information
Wiki
Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings English 2010 Online communities produce rich behavioral datasets, e.g., Usenet news conversations, Wikipedia edits, and Facebook friend networks. Analysis of such datasets yields important insights (like the "long tail" of user participation) and suggests novel design interventions (like targeting users with personalized opportunities and work requests). However, certain key user data typically are unavailable, specifically viewing, pre-registration, and non-logged-in activity. The absence of data makes some questions hard to answer; ac- cess to it can strengthen, extend, or cast doubt on previous results. We report on analysis of user behavior in Cyclopath, a geographic wiki and route-finder for bicyclists. With access to viewing and non-logged-in activity data, we were able to: (a) replicate and extend prior work on user lifecycles in Wikipedia, (b) bring to light some pre-registration activity, thus testing for the presence of "educational lurking," and (c) demonstrate the locality of geographic activity and how editing and viewing are geographically correlated. 0 0
Wikipedians are born, not made: A study of power editors on Wikipedia Collaboration
Contribution
Power editors
Wiki
Wikipedia
GROUP'09 - Proceedings of the 2009 ACM SIGCHI International Conference on Supporting Group Work English 2009 Open content web sites depend on users to produce information of value. Wikipedia is the largest and most well-known such site. Previous work has shown that a small fraction of editors - Wikipedians - do most of the work and produce most of the value. Other work has offered conjectures about how Wikipedians differ from other editors and how Wikipedians change over time. We quantify and test these conjectures. Our key findings include: Wikipedians' edits last longer; Wikipedians invoke community norms more often to justify their edits; on many dimensions of activity, Wikipedians start intensely, tail off a little, then maintain a relatively high level of activity over the course of their career. Finally, we show that the amount of work done by Wikipedians and non-Wikipedians differs significantly from their very first day. Our results suggest a design opportunity: customizing the initial user experience to improve retention and channel new users' intense energy. 0 5
Wikipedians are born, not made: a study of power editors on Wikipedia GROUP English 2009 Open content web sites depend on users to produce information of value. Wikipedia is the largest and most well-known such site. Previous work has shown that a small fraction of editors --Wikipedians -- do most of the work and produce most of the value. Other work has offered conjectures about how Wikipedians differ from other editors and how Wikipedians change over time. We quantify and test these conjectures. Our key findings include: Wikipedians' edits last longer; Wikipedians invoke community norms more often to justify their edits; on many dimensions of activity, Wikipedians start intensely, tail off a little, then maintain a relatively high level of activity over the course of their career. Finally, we show that the amount of work done by Wikipedians and non-Wikipedians differs significantly from their very first day. Our results suggest a design opportunity: customizing the initial user experience to improve retention and channel new users' intense energy. 0 5
The computational geowiki: What, why, and how Computational geowiki
Geowiki
Web-map
Wiki
English 2008 Google Maps and its spin-offs are highly successful, but they have a major limitation: users see only pictures of geographic data. These data are inaccessible except by limited vendor-defined APIs, and associated user data are weakly linked to them. But some applications require access, specifically geowikis and computational geowikis. We present the design and implementation of a computational geowiki. We also show empirically that both geowiki and computational geowiki features are necessary for a representative domain, bicycling, because (a) cyclists have useful knowledge unavailable except from cyclists and (b) cyclist-oriented automatic route-finding is enhanced by user input. Finally, we derive design implications: for example, user contributions presented within a route description are useful, and wikis should support contribution of opinion as well as fact. Copyright 2008 ACM. 0 0
Creating, Destroying, and Restoring Value in Wikipedia Wikipedia Department of Computer Science and Engineering University of Minnesota 2007 Wikipedia's brilliance and curse is that any user can edit any of the encyclopedia entries. We introduce the notion of the impact of an edit, measured by the number of times the edited version is viewed. Using several datasets, including recent logs of all article views, we show that an overwhelming majority of the viewed words were written by frequent editors and that this majority is increasing. Similarly, using the same impact measure, we show that the probability of a typical article view being damaged is small but increasing, and we present empirically grounded classes of damage. Finally, we make policy recommendations for Wikipedia and other wikis in light of these findings. 0 12
Creating, destroying, and restoring value in Wikipedia English 2007 Wikipedia's brilliance and curse is that any user can edit any of the encyclopedia entries. We introduce the notion of the impact of an edit, measured by the number of times the edited version is viewed. Using several datasets, including recent logs of all article views, we show that an overwhelming majority of the viewed words were written by frequent editors and that this majority is increasing. Similarly, using the same impact measure, we show that the probability of a typical article view being damaged is small but increasing, and we present empirically grounded classes of damage. Finally, we make policy recommendations for Wikipedia and other wikis in light of these findings. 0 12
How a personalized geowiki can help bicyclists share information more effectively Geography
Geowiki
Personalization
Wiki
Proceedings of the Conference on Object-Oriented Programming Systems, Languages, and Applications, OOPSLA English 2007 The bicycling community is focused around a real-world activity - navigating a bicycle - which requires planning within a complex and ever-changing space. While all the knowledge needed to find good routes exists, it is highly distributed. We show, using the results of surveys and interviews, that cyclists need a comprehensive, up-to-date, and personalized information resource. We introduce the personalized geowiki, a new type of wiki which meets these requirements, and we formalize the notion of geowiki. Finally, we state some general prerequisites for wiki contribution and show that they are met by cyclists. Copyright 0 0
SuggestBot: Using intelligent task routing to help people find work in wikipedia Intelligent task routing
Member-maintained communities
Online community
Recommender system
Wikipedia
International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces, Proceedings IUI English 2007 Member-maintained communities ask their users to perform tasks the community needs. From Slashdot, to IMDb, to Wikipedia, groups with diverse interests create community-maintained artifacts of lasting value (CALV) that support the group's main purpose and provide value to others. Said communities don't help members find work to do, or do so without regard to individual preferences, such as Slashdot assigning meta-moderation randomly. Yet social science theory suggests that reducing the cost and increasing the personal value of contribution would motivate members to participate more.We present SuggestBot, software that performs intelligent task routing (matching people with tasks) in Wikipedia. SuggestBot uses broadly applicable strategies of text analysis, collaborative filtering, and hyperlink following to recommend tasks. SuggestBot's intelligent task routing increases the number of edits by roughly four times compared to suggesting random articles. Our contributions are: 1) demonstrating the value of intelligent task routing in a real deployment; 2) showing how to do intelligent task routing; and 3) sharing our experience of deploying a tool in Wikipedia, which offered both challenges and opportunities for research. Copyright 2007 ACM. 0 1
SuggestBot: using intelligent task routing to help people find work in Wikipedia Online community
Member-maintained communities
Wikipedia
Intelligent task routing
Recommender system
English 2007 Member-maintained communities ask their users to perform tasks the community needs. From Slashdot, to IMDb, to Wikipedia, groups with diverse interests create community-maintained artifacts of lasting value (CALV) that support the group's main purpose and provide value to others. Said communities don't help members find work to do, or do so without regard to individual preferences, such as Slashdot assigning meta-moderation randomly. Yet social science theory suggests that reducing the cost and increasing the personal value of contribution would motivate members to participate more. We present SuggestBot, software that performs intelligent task routing (matching people with tasks) in Wikipedia. SuggestBot uses broadly applicable strategies of text analysis, collaborative filtering, and hyperlink following to recommend tasks. SuggestBot's intelligent task routing increases the number of edits by roughly four times compared to suggesting random articles. Our contributions are: 1) demonstrating the value of intelligent task routing in a real deployment; 2) showing how to do intelligent task routing; and 3) sharing our experience of deploying a tool in Wikipedia, which offered both challenges and opportunities for research. 0 1
Using intelligent task rooting and contribution review to help communities build artifacts of lasting value Contribution models
Editorial review
Intelligent task routing
Member-maintained
Online community
Wikipedia
Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings English 2006 Many online communities are emerging that, like Wikipedia, bring people together to build community-maintained artifacts of lasting value (CALVs). Motivating people to contribute is a key problem because the quantity and quality of contributions ultimately determine a CALVs value. We pose two related research questions: 1) How does intelligent task routing - matching people with work - affect the quantity of contributions? 2) How does reviewing contributions before accepting them affect the quality of contributions? A field experiment with 197 contributors shows that simple, intelligent task routing algorithms have large effects. We also model the effect of reviewing contributions on the value of CALVs. The model predicts, and experimental data shows, that value grows more slowly with review before acceptance. It also predicts, surprisingly, that a CALV will reach the same final value whether contributions are reviewed before or after they are made available to the community. Copyright 2006 ACM. 0 0