Judd Antin

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Judd Antin is an author.

Publications

Only those publications related to wikis are shown here.
Title Keyword(s) Published in Language DateThis property is a special property in this wiki. Abstract R C
Some of all human knowledge: Gender and participation in peer production Gender
Open source
Peer production
Wikipedia
English 2012 The promise of peer production includes resources produced by volunteers and released freely for the world to use. Wikipedia and Open Source Software are famous examples of peer-produced projects. Anyone is free to participate, but not everybody does. Wikipedia aims to collect the "sum of all human knowledge", but only about 13% of editors on the site are female [3]. In Open Source Software, the percentage of female contributors has been estimated near 1% [4]. If women are not well represented among authors of the most widely accessed reference source on the planet, are important voices muted? Could these projects be even more impactful with more female participation? This panel includes experts in gender theory and open collaboration, activists, and representatives from peer-produced projects to discuss recent findings and trends in this complex and often contentious research space. 0 0
Technology-mediated contributions: Editing behaviors among new wikipedians Legitimate peripheral participation.
Wiki-work
Wikipedia
English 2012 The power-law distribution of participation characterizes a wide variety of technology-mediated social participation (TMSP) systems, and Wikipedia is no exception. A minority of active contributors does most of the work. While the existence of a core of highly active contributors is well documented, how those individuals came to be so active is less well understood. In this study we extend prior research on TMSP and Wikipedia by examining in detail the characteristics of the revisions that new contributors make. In particular we focus on new users who maintain a minimum level of sustained activity during their first six months. We use content analysis of individual revisions as well as other quantitative techniques to examine three research questions regarding the effect of early diversification of activity, nature vs. nurture, and associations with later administrative and organizational activity. We present analyses that address each of these questions, and conclude with implications for our understanding of the progression of participation on Wikipedia and other TMSP systems. 0 1
Gender differences in Wikipedia editing Wikipedia
Gender
Participation
WikiSym English 2011 As Wikipedia has become an indispensable source of online information, concerns about who writes, edits, and maintains it have come to the forefront. In particular, the 2010 UNU-MERIT survey found evidence of a significant gender skew: fewer than 13% of Wikipedia contributors are women. However, the number of contributors is just one way to examine gender differences in contribution. In this paper we take a more fine-grained perspective by examining how much and what types of Wiki-work men and women tend to do. First, we find that the so-called “Gender Gap” in number of editors may not be as wide as prior studies have suggested. Second, although more than 80% of editors in our sample were men, among the bottom 75% of editors by activity level, we find that men and women made similar numbers of revisions. However, among the most active Wikipedians men tended to make many more revisions than women. Finally, we find that the most active women in our sample tended to make larger revisions than the most active men. We conclude by discussing directions for future research. 0 2
My kind of people? Perceptions about wikipedia contributors and their motivations Community
Participation
Wikipedia
Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings English 2011 Perceptions of information products such as Wikipedia can depend on assumptions and stereotypes about the people who create them. As new Wikipedians consider contributing they are likely to apply such assumptions and ask themselves: "Are Wikipedia contributors my kind of people? Is this a group I'd like to belong to?" In this qualitative study I address the potential challenge of these questions by exploring readers and infrequent editors' perceptions of Wikipedia contributors and their motivations. Through analysis of twenty semi-structured interviews, I find evidence of strong negative perceptions as well as positive ones which nonetheless prevent users from identifying with active Wikipedia contributors. I argue that these perceptions present a barrier to the progression of participation over time. I conclude by discussing the practical challenges of my findings for Wikipedia and other online collaborative systems. Copyright 2011 ACM. 0 1
My kind of people?: perceptions about Wikipedia contributors and their motivations Proceedings of the 2011 annual conference on Human factors in computing systems English 2011 Perceptions of information products such as Wikipedia can depend on assumptions and stereotypes about the people who create them. As new Wikipedians consider contributing they are likely to apply such assumptions and ask themselves: "Are Wikipedia contributors my kind of people? Is this a group I'd like to belong to?" In this qualitative study I address the potential challenge of these questions by exploring readers and infrequent editors' perceptions of Wikipedia contributors and their motivations. Through analysis of twenty semi-structured interviews, I find evidence of strong negative perceptions as well as positive ones which nonetheless prevent users from identifying with active Wikipedia contributors. I argue that these perceptions present a barrier to the progression of participation over time. I conclude by discussing the practical challenges of my findings for Wikipedia and other online collaborative systems. 14 1
Readers are not free-riders: reading as a form of participation on Wikipedia Wikipedia
Participation
Free-riding
Motivation
Incomplete information
Social computing
Computer-Supported Cooperative Work English 2010 The success of Wikipedia as a large-scale collaborative effort has spurred researchers to examine the motivations and behaviors of Wikipedia's participants. However, this research has tended to focus on active involvement rather than more common forms of participation such as reading. In this paper we argue that Wikipedia's readers should not all be characterized as free-riders -- individuals who knowingly choose to take advantage of others' effort. Furthermore, we illustrate how readers provide a valuable service to Wikipedia. Finally, we use the notion of legitimate peripheral participation to argue that reading is a gateway activity through which newcomers learn about Wikipedia. We find support for our arguments in the results of a survey of Wikipedia usage and knowledge. Implications for future research and design are discussed. 0 5