Dan Cosley

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Dan Cosley is an author.

Publications

Only those publications related to wikis are shown here.
Title Keyword(s) Published in Language DateThis property is a special property in this wiki. Abstract R C
Tell me more: An actionable quality model for wikipedia Classication
Flaw detection
Information quality
Machine learning
Modelling
Wikipedia
Proceedings of the 9th International Symposium on Open Collaboration, WikiSym + OpenSym 2013 English 2013 In this paper we address the problem of developing actionable quality models for Wikipedia, models whose features directly suggest strategies for improving the quality of a given article. We rst survey the literature in order to understand the notion of article quality in the context of Wikipedia and existing approaches to automatically assess article quality. We then develop classication models with varying combinations of more or less actionable features, and nd that a model that only contains clearly actionable features delivers solid performance. Lastly we discuss the implications of these results in terms of how they can help improve the quality of articles across Wikipedia. Categories and Subject Descriptors H.5 [Information Interfaces and Presentation]: Group and Organization InterfacesCollaborative computing, Computer-supported cooperative work, Web-based interac- Tion. Copyright 2010 ACM. 0 0
Finding social roles in Wikipedia English 2011 This paper investigates some of the social roles people play in the online community of Wikipedia. We start from qualitative comments posted on community oriented pages, wiki project memberships, and user talk pages in order to identify a sample of editors who represent four key roles: substantive experts, technical editors, vandal fighters, and social networkers. Patterns in edit histories and egocentric network visualizations suggest potential "structural signatures" that could be used as quantitative indicators of role adoption. Using simple metrics based on edit histories we compare two samples of Wikipedians: a collection of long term dedicated editors, and a cohort of editors from a one month window of new arrivals. According to these metrics, we find that the proportions of editor types in the new cohort are similar those observed in the sample of dedicated contributors. The number of new editors playing helpful roles in a single month's cohort nearly equal the number found in the dedicated sample. This suggests that informal socialization has the potential provide sufficient role related labor despite growth and change in Wikipedia. These results are preliminary, and we describe several ways that the method can be improved, including the expansion and refinement of role signatures and identification of other important social roles. 0 5
Self-Governance Through Group Discussion in Wikipedia: Measuring Deliberation in Online Groups Small Group Research English 2011 Virtual teams and other online groups can find it challenging to establish norms that allow them to effectively balance task and relational aspects of their discussions. Yet, in our reliance on organizational and team theories, small group scholars have overlooked the potential for learning from examples offered by online communities.Theories of deliberation in small groups offer scholars a way to assess such discussion-centered self-governance in online groups.The study operationalizes the conceptual definition of deliberative discussion offered by Gastil and Black (2008) to examine the small group discussions that undergird policy-making processes in a well-established online community, Wikipedia. Content analysis shows that these discussions demonstrated a relatively high level of problem analysis and providing of information, but results were mixed in the group’s demonstration of respect, consideration, and mutual comprehension. Network visualizations reveal structural patterns that can be useful in examining equality, influence, and group member roles. The combination of measures has implications for future research in deliberative discussion and virtual teamwork. 0 1
What's mine is mine: Territoriality in collaborative authoring Authorship
Collaboration
Ownership
Territoriality
Wikipedia
Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings English 2009 Territoriality, the expression of ownership towards an object, can emerge when social actors occupy a shared social space. In the case of Wikipedia, the prevailing cultural norm is one that warns against ownership of one's work. However, we observe the emergence of territoriality in online space with respect to a subset of articles that have been tagged with the Maintained template through a qualitative study of 15 editors who have self-designated as Maintainers. Our participants communicated ownership, demarcated boundaries and asserted their control over artifacts for the sake of quality by appropriating existing features of Wikipedia. We then suggest design strategies to support these behaviors in the proper context within collaborative authoring systems more generally. Copyright 2009 ACM. 0 0
SuggestBot: Using intelligent task routing to help people find work in wikipedia Intelligent task routing
Member-maintained communities
Online community
Recommender system
Wikipedia
International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces, Proceedings IUI English 2007 Member-maintained communities ask their users to perform tasks the community needs. From Slashdot, to IMDb, to Wikipedia, groups with diverse interests create community-maintained artifacts of lasting value (CALV) that support the group's main purpose and provide value to others. Said communities don't help members find work to do, or do so without regard to individual preferences, such as Slashdot assigning meta-moderation randomly. Yet social science theory suggests that reducing the cost and increasing the personal value of contribution would motivate members to participate more.We present SuggestBot, software that performs intelligent task routing (matching people with tasks) in Wikipedia. SuggestBot uses broadly applicable strategies of text analysis, collaborative filtering, and hyperlink following to recommend tasks. SuggestBot's intelligent task routing increases the number of edits by roughly four times compared to suggesting random articles. Our contributions are: 1) demonstrating the value of intelligent task routing in a real deployment; 2) showing how to do intelligent task routing; and 3) sharing our experience of deploying a tool in Wikipedia, which offered both challenges and opportunities for research. Copyright 2007 ACM. 0 1
SuggestBot: using intelligent task routing to help people find work in Wikipedia Online community
Member-maintained communities
Wikipedia
Intelligent task routing
Recommender system
English 2007 Member-maintained communities ask their users to perform tasks the community needs. From Slashdot, to IMDb, to Wikipedia, groups with diverse interests create community-maintained artifacts of lasting value (CALV) that support the group's main purpose and provide value to others. Said communities don't help members find work to do, or do so without regard to individual preferences, such as Slashdot assigning meta-moderation randomly. Yet social science theory suggests that reducing the cost and increasing the personal value of contribution would motivate members to participate more. We present SuggestBot, software that performs intelligent task routing (matching people with tasks) in Wikipedia. SuggestBot uses broadly applicable strategies of text analysis, collaborative filtering, and hyperlink following to recommend tasks. SuggestBot's intelligent task routing increases the number of edits by roughly four times compared to suggesting random articles. Our contributions are: 1) demonstrating the value of intelligent task routing in a real deployment; 2) showing how to do intelligent task routing; and 3) sharing our experience of deploying a tool in Wikipedia, which offered both challenges and opportunities for research. 0 1
Using intelligent task rooting and contribution review to help communities build artifacts of lasting value Contribution models
Editorial review
Intelligent task routing
Member-maintained
Online community
Wikipedia
Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings English 2006 Many online communities are emerging that, like Wikipedia, bring people together to build community-maintained artifacts of lasting value (CALVs). Motivating people to contribute is a key problem because the quantity and quality of contributions ultimately determine a CALVs value. We pose two related research questions: 1) How does intelligent task routing - matching people with work - affect the quantity of contributions? 2) How does reviewing contributions before accepting them affect the quality of contributions? A field experiment with 197 contributors shows that simple, intelligent task routing algorithms have large effects. We also model the effect of reviewing contributions on the value of CALVs. The model predicts, and experimental data shows, that value grows more slowly with review before acceptance. It also predicts, surprisingly, that a CALV will reach the same final value whether contributions are reviewed before or after they are made available to the community. Copyright 2006 ACM. 0 0