Current events

From WikiPapers
Jump to: navigation, search

Current events is included as keyword or extra keyword in 0 datasets, 0 tools and 4 publications.

Datasets

There is no datasets for this keyword.

Tools

There is no tools for this keyword.


Publications

Title Author(s) Published in Language DateThis property is a special property in this wiki. Abstract R C
A history of newswork on wikipedia Brian C. Keegan Proceedings of the 9th International Symposium on Open Collaboration, WikiSym + OpenSym 2013 English 2013 Wikipedia's coverage of current events blurs the boundaries of what it means to be an encyclopedia. Drawing on Gieyrn's concept of \boundary work", this paper explores how Wiki- pedia's response to the 9/11 attacks expanded the role of the encyclopedia to include newswork, excluded content like the 9/11 Memorial Wiki that became problematic following this expansion, and legitimized these changes through the adop- Tion of news-related policies and routines like promoting "In the News" content on the homepage. However, a second case exploring WikiNews illustrates the pitfalls of misappropriat- ing professional newswork norms as well as the challenges of sustaining online communities. These cases illuminate the social construction of new technologies as they confront the boundaries of traditional professional identities and also re- veal how newswork is changing in response to new forms of organizing enabled by these technologies. Categories and Subject Descriptors K.2 [Computing Milieux]: History of Computing; K.4.3 [Computers and Society]: Organizational ImpactsCom- puter supported collaborative work General Terms Standardization,Theory. Copyright 2010 ACM. 0 0
Breaking news on Wikipedia: Dynamics, structures, and roles in high-tempo collaboration Brian C. Keegan English 2012 The goal of my research is to evaluate how distributed virtual teams are able to use socio-technical systems like Wikipedia to self-organize and respond to complex tasks. I examine the roles Wikipedians adopt to synthesize content about breaking news events out of a noisy and complex information space. Using data from Wikipedia's revision histories as well as from other sources like IRC logs, I employ methods in content analysis, statistical network analysis, and trace ethnography to illuminate the multilevel processes which sustain these temporary collaborations as well as the dynamics of how they emerge and dissolve. 0 0
Collective memory building in Wikipedia: The case of North African uprisings Michela Ferron
Paolo Massa
WikiSym English 2011 Since December 2010, a series of protests and uprisings have shocked North African countries such as Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, Syria, Yemen and more. In this paper, focusing mainly on the Egyptian revolution, we provide evidence of the intense edit activity occurred during these uprisings on the related Wikipedia pages. Thousands of people provided their contribution on the content pages and discussed improvements and disagreements on the associated talk pages as the traumatic events unfolded. We propose to interpret this phenomenon as a process of collective memory building and argue how on Wikipedia this can be studied empirically and quantitatively in real time. We explore and suggest possible directions for future research on collective memory formation of traumatic and controversial events in Wikipedia. 14 0
Hot off the Wiki: Dynamics, Practices, and Structures in Wikipedia’s Coverage of the Tōhoku Catastrophes Brian Keegan
Darren Gergle
Darren Contractor
WikiSym English 2011 Wikipedia editors are uniquely motivated to collaborate around current and breaking news events. However, the speed, urgency, and intensity with which these collaborations unfold also impose a substantial burden on editors’ abilities to effectively coordinate tasks and process information. We analyze the patterns of activity on Wikipedia following the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami to understand the dynamics of editor attention and participation, novel practices employed to collaborate on these articles, and the resulting coauthorship structures which emerge between editors and articles. Our findings have implications for supporting future coverage of breaking news articles, theorizing about motivations to participate in online community, and illuminating Wikipedia’s potential role in storing cultural memories of catastrophe. 0 0