Andreas Holzinger

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Andreas Holzinger is an author.

Publications

Only those publications related to wikis are shown here.
Title Keyword(s) Published in Language DateThis property is a special property in this wiki. Abstract R C
ArchaeoApp Rome Edition (AARE): Making invisible sites visible: e-business aspects of historic knowledge discovery via mobile devices Archaeology
Classics
E-Business
History
Information retrieval on mobile devices
Knowledge management
Tourists
DCNET 2012, ICE-B 2012, OPTICS 2012 - Proceedings of the International Conference on Data Communication Networking, e-Business and Optical Communication Systems, ICETE English 2012 Rome is visited by 7 to 10 million tourists per year, many of them interested in historical sites. Most sites that are described in tourist guides (printed or online) are archaeological sites; we can call them visible archaeological sites. Unfortunately, even visible archaeological sites in Rome are barely marked - and invisible sites are completely ignored. In this paper, we present the ArchaeoApp Rome Edition (AARE). The novelty is not just to mark the important, visible, barely known sites, but to mark the invisible sites, consequently introducing a completely novel type of site to the tourist guidance: historical invisible sites. One challenge is to get to reliable, historic information on demand. A possible approach is to retrieve the information from Wikipedia directly. The second challenge is that most of the end users have no Web-access due to the high roaming costs. The third challenge is to address a balance between the best platform available and the most used platform. For e-Business purposes, it is of course necessary to support the highest possible amount of various mobile platforms (Android, iOS and Windows Phone). The advantages of AARE include: no roaming costs, data update on demand (when connected to Wi-Fi, e.g. at a hotel, at a public hotspot, etc.. for free), automatic nearby notification of invisible sites (markers) with a Visual- Auditory-Tactile technique to make invisible sites visible. 0 0
Utilizing Wiki-Systems in higher education classes: A chance for universal access? Universal Access in the Information Society 2008 Wikis are a website technology for mass collaborative authoring. Today, wikis are increasingly used for educational purposes. Basically, the most important asset of wikis is free and easy access for end users: everybody can contribute, comment and edit - following the principles of Universal access. Consequently, wikis are ideally suited for collaborative learning and a number of studies reported a great success of wikis in terms of active participation, collaboration, and a rapidly growing content. However, the wikis success in education was often linked either to direct incentives or even pressure. This paper strongly argues that this contradicts the original intentions of wikis and, furthermore, weakens the psycho-pedagogical impact. A study is presented which focuses on investigating the success of wikis in higher education, when students are neither enforced to contribute nor directly rewarded similar to the principles of Wikipedia. Amazingly, the results show that, in total, none of the N = 287 students created new articles or edited existing ones during a whole semester. It is concluded that the use of {Wiki-Systems} in educational settings is much more complicated, and it needs more time to develop a kind of give-and-take" generation. {Springer-Verlag} 2008." 0 1
Utilizing Wiki-Systems in higher education classes: a chance for universal access? Universal Access in the Information Society English 2008 Wikis are a website technology for mass collaborative authoring. Today, wikis are increasingly used for educational purposes. Basically, the most important asset of wikis is free and easy access for end users: everybody can contribute, comment and edit—following the principles of Universal access. Consequently, wikis are ideally suited for collaborative learning and a number of studies reported a great success of wikis in terms of active participation, collaboration, and a rapidly growing content. However, the wikis success in education was often linked either to direct incentives or even pressure. This paper strongly argues that this contradicts the original intentions of wikis and, furthermore, weakens the psycho-pedagogical impact. A study is presented which focuses on investigating the success of wikis in higher education, when students are neither enforced to contribute nor directly rewarded similar to the principles of Wikipedia. Amazingly, the results show that, in total, none of the N = 287 students created new articles or edited existing ones during a whole semester. It is concluded that the use of Wiki-Systems in educational settings is much more complicated, and it needs more time to develop a kind of “give-and-take” generation. 0 1