Andrea Forte

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Andrea Forte is an author from Italy.

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Only those publications related to wikis are shown here.
Title Keyword(s) Published in Language DateThis property is a special property in this wiki. Abstract R C
Designing information savvy societies: An introduction to assessability Assessability
Credibility
Information literacy
Wikipedia
Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings English 2014 This paper provides first steps toward an empirically grounded design vocabulary for assessable design as an HCI response to the global need for better information literacy skills. We present a framework for synthesizing literatures called the Interdisciplinary Literacy Framework and use it to highlight gaps in our understanding of information literacy that HCI as a field is particularly well suited to fill. We report on two studies that lay a foundation for developing guidelines for assessable information system design. The first is a study of Wikipedians', librarians', and laypersons' information assessment practices from which we derive two important features of assessable designs: Information provenance and stewardship. The second is an experimental study in which we operationalize these concepts in designs and test them using Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk). 0 0
Defining, Understanding, and Supporting Open Collaboration: Lessons From the Literature Open collaboration
Open source software
Peer production
Wiki
Wikipedia
American Behavioral Scientist English 2013 In this short introductory piece, we define open collaboration and contextualize the diverse articles in this special issue in a common vocabulary and history. We provide a definition of open collaboration and situate the phenomenon within an interrelated set of scholarly and ideological movements. We then examine the properties of open collaboration systems that have given rise to research and review major areas of scholarship. We close with a summary of consistent findings in open collaboration research to date. 0 0
Coordination and beyond: Social functions of groups in open content production Groupwork
Open content
Peer production
Wikipedia
Wikiprojects
English 2012 We report on a study of the English edition of Wikipedia in which we used a mixed methods approach to understand how nested organizational structures called WikiProjects support collaboration. We first conducted two rounds of interviews with a total of 20 Wikipedians to understand how WikiProjects function and what it's like to participate in them from the perspective of Wikipedia editors. We then used a quantitative approach to further explore interpretations that arose from the qualitative data. Our analysis of these data together demonstrates how WikiProjects not only help Wikipedians coordinate tasks and produce articles, but also support community members and small groups of editors in important ways such as: providing a place to find collaborators, socialize and network; protecting editors' work; and structuring opportunities to contribute. 0 0
How people assess cooperatively authored information resources Credibility
Peer production
Wikipedia
WikiSym 2012 English 2012 This work in progress highlights late-breaking results and foreshadows opportunities for designing interfaces that help support credibility assessment of cooperatively authored information resources. 0 0
Some of all human knowledge: Gender and participation in peer production Gender
Open source
Peer production
Wikipedia
English 2012 The promise of peer production includes resources produced by volunteers and released freely for the world to use. Wikipedia and Open Source Software are famous examples of peer-produced projects. Anyone is free to participate, but not everybody does. Wikipedia aims to collect the "sum of all human knowledge", but only about 13% of editors on the site are female [3]. In Open Source Software, the percentage of female contributors has been estimated near 1% [4]. If women are not well represented among authors of the most widely accessed reference source on the planet, are important voices muted? Could these projects be even more impactful with more female participation? This panel includes experts in gender theory and open collaboration, activists, and representatives from peer-produced projects to discuss recent findings and trends in this complex and often contentious research space. 0 0
What aren't we measuring?: Methods for quantifying wiki-work Measure
Method
Metric
Open collaboration
Peer production
Wiki
WikiSym 2012 English 2012 Wikis and other open collaboration systems rely on the work of contributors to survive. But what is work and how do we quantify it? Answering this question in the right context is essential for attaining robust and generalizable results across open contribution systems. Our goal is to develop a repertoire of metrics and understand their possible dimensions in order to refine our ability as a research community to measure wikis and wiki activity appropriately across a wide range of contexts. This panel explores the current practice of measuring work in wikis, offers perspectives about the limitations of current approaches and suggests new opportunities for measuring contribution behavior. 0 0
Decentralization in Wikipedia Governance English 2009 How does "self-governance" happen in Wikipedia? Through in-depth interviews with 20 individuals who have held a variety of responsibilities in the English-language Wikipedia, we obtained rich descriptions of how various forces produce and regulate social structures on the site. Although Wikipedia is sometimes portrayed as lacking oversight, our analysis describes Wikipedia as an organization with highly refined policies, norms, and a technological architecture that supports organizational ideals of consensus building and discussion. We describe how governance on the site is becoming increasingly decentralized as the community grows and how this is predicted by theories of commons-based governance developed in offline contexts. We also briefly examine local governance structures called WikiProjects through the example of WikiProject Military History, one of the oldest and most prolific projects on the site. 0 2
ProveIt: A new tool for supporting citation in MediaWiki WikiSym English 2009 ProveIt is an extension to the Mozilla Firefox browser designed to support editors in citing sources in Wikipedia and other projects that use the MediaWiki platform. Copyright 0 0
ProveIt: a new tool for supporting citation in MediaWiki WikiSym English 2009 0 0
Scaling Consensus: Increasing Decentralization in Wikipedia Governance HICSS English 2008 0 4
Scaling consensus: Increasing decentralization in Wikipedia governance Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences English 2008 How does "self-governance" happen in Wikipedia? Through in-depth interviews with eleven individuals who have held a variety of responsibilities in the English Wikipedia, we obtained rich descriptions of how various forces produce and regulate social structures on the site. Our analysis describes Wikipedia as an organization with highly refined policies, norms, and a technological architecture that supports organizational ideals of consensus building and discussion. We describe how governance in the site is becoming increasingly decentralized as the community grows and how this is predicted by theories of commons-based governance developed in offline contexts. The trend of decentralization is noticeable with respect to both content-related decision making processes and social structures that regulate user behavior. 0 4
Constructing text: Wiki as a toolkit for (collaborative?) learning Collaboration
Constructionism
Education
Knowledge building
Open content
Wiki
WikiSym English 2007 Writing a book from which others can learn is itself a powerful learning experience. Based on this proposition, we have launched Science Online, a wiki to support learning in high school science classrooms through the collaborative production of an online science resource. Our approach to designing educational uses of technology is based on an approach to education called constructionism, which advocates learning by working on personally meaningful projects. Our research examines the ways that constructionism connects to collective models of knowledge production and learning such as Knowledge Building. In this paper, we explore ways that collaboration using wiki tools fits into the constructionist approach, we examine learning goals for youth growing up in a read-write culture, and we discuss preliminary findings in an ongoing year-long study of Science Online in the classroom. Despite the radically open collaboration afforded by wiki, we observe that many factors conspired to stymie collaborative writing on the site. We expected to find cultural barriers to wiki adoption in schools. Unexpectedly, we are also finding that the design of the wiki tool itself contributed barriers to collaborative writing in the classroom. 0 2
From Wikipedia to the classroom: exploring online publication and learning ICLS English 2006 0 3