Amy Bruckman

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Amy Bruckman is an author.

Amy Bruckman is an author.

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Only those publications related to wikis are shown here.
Title Keyword(s) Published in Language DateThis property is a special property in this wiki. Abstract R C
Coordination and beyond: Social functions of groups in open content production Groupwork
Open content
Peer production
Wikipedia
Wikiprojects
English 2012 We report on a study of the English edition of Wikipedia in which we used a mixed methods approach to understand how nested organizational structures called WikiProjects support collaboration. We first conducted two rounds of interviews with a total of 20 Wikipedians to understand how WikiProjects function and what it's like to participate in them from the perspective of Wikipedia editors. We then used a quantitative approach to further explore interpretations that arose from the qualitative data. Our analysis of these data together demonstrates how WikiProjects not only help Wikipedians coordinate tasks and produce articles, but also support community members and small groups of editors in important ways such as: providing a place to find collaborators, socialize and network; protecting editors' work; and structuring opportunities to contribute. 0 0
Leadership and success factors in online creative collaboration IEEE Potentials English 2011 Social computing systems have enabled new and wildly successful forms of creative collaboration to take place. Two of the best-known examples are Wikipedia and the open-source software (OSS) movement. Wikipedia, the free online encyclopedia, boasts millions of articles (over 3.6 million just in English) written by thousands of volunteers collaborating via the Internet. The OSS movement, also fueled mainly by volunteer online collaboration, has produced some of the worlds most powerful and important software applications, including the Apache HTTP Server, the Linux operating system, and the Mozilla Firefox Web browser. 0 0
Designing online environments for expert/novice collaboration: Wikis to support legitimate peripheral participation Collaboration
Game Ontology Project
Games education
Games literacy
Legitimate peripheral participation
Wiki
Convergence English 2010 Designing environments that can bring novices and experts together is not trivial. We explore how we can design environments where these collaborations happen in such a way that everyone benefits. We explore these questions in the context of one such environment. In this study, we used the Game Ontology Project (GOP), a wiki-enabled hierarchy of elements of gameplay used by game studies researchers, in a game design class. Students found that their participation was enjoyable and useful for learning. Also, there is evidence that they developed a deeper understanding of the medium of videogames. However, encouraging sustained participation was challenging because students tended to view the GOP as a static source, rather than a participatory and editable resource. Expert analysis of the students' contributions to the ontology found them to be useful and significant. We conclude with thoughts on the importance of these kinds of authentic environments in traditional learning. 0 0
Decentralization in Wikipedia Governance English 2009 How does "self-governance" happen in Wikipedia? Through in-depth interviews with 20 individuals who have held a variety of responsibilities in the English-language Wikipedia, we obtained rich descriptions of how various forces produce and regulate social structures on the site. Although Wikipedia is sometimes portrayed as lacking oversight, our analysis describes Wikipedia as an organization with highly refined policies, norms, and a technological architecture that supports organizational ideals of consensus building and discussion. We describe how governance on the site is becoming increasingly decentralized as the community grows and how this is predicted by theories of commons-based governance developed in offline contexts. We also briefly examine local governance structures called WikiProjects through the example of WikiProject Military History, one of the oldest and most prolific projects on the site. 0 2
ProveIt: A new tool for supporting citation in MediaWiki WikiSym English 2009 ProveIt is an extension to the Mozilla Firefox browser designed to support editors in citing sources in Wikipedia and other projects that use the MediaWiki platform. Copyright 0 0
ProveIt: a new tool for supporting citation in MediaWiki WikiSym English 2009 0 0
Leadership in online creative collaboration Animation
Leadership
Online creative collaboration
English 2008 Leadership plays a central role in the success of many forms of online creative collaboration, yet little is known about the challenges leaders must manage. In this paper, we report on a qualitative study of leadership in three online communities whose members collaborate over the Internet to create computer-animated movies called "collabs." Our results indicate that most collabs fail. Collab leaders face two major challenges. First, leaders must design collabora-tive projects. Second, leaders must manage artists during the collab production process. We contrast these challenges with the available empirical research on leadership in open-source software and Wikipedia, identifying four themes: originality, completion, subjectivity, and ownership. We conclude with broader implications for online creative col-laboration in its many forms. Copyright 2008 ACM. 0 0
Scaling Consensus: Increasing Decentralization in Wikipedia Governance HICSS English 2008 0 4
Scaling consensus: Increasing decentralization in Wikipedia governance Proceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences English 2008 How does "self-governance" happen in Wikipedia? Through in-depth interviews with eleven individuals who have held a variety of responsibilities in the English Wikipedia, we obtained rich descriptions of how various forces produce and regulate social structures on the site. Our analysis describes Wikipedia as an organization with highly refined policies, norms, and a technological architecture that supports organizational ideals of consensus building and discussion. We describe how governance in the site is becoming increasingly decentralized as the community grows and how this is predicted by theories of commons-based governance developed in offline contexts. The trend of decentralization is noticeable with respect to both content-related decision making processes and social structures that regulate user behavior. 0 4
Social support for creativity and learning online Proceedings - 2nd IEEE International Conference on Digital Game and Intelligent Toy Enhanced Learning, DIGITEL 2008 English 2008 In the mid 1990s, we began to ask some hopeful questions about the potential of the Internet to empower the individual: Can users become creators of content, rather than merely recipients? What can people learn through working on personally meaningful projects and sharing them online? If content creation is to some degree democratized, does this have broader cultural or political implications? This enthusiasm faded a bit by the dot-com bust, and many began to wonder: will it be business-as-usual after all? But then it started happening. On Wikipedia, thousands of volunteers collaborate to create a shared resource that, while not without flaws, is astonishing in its breadth and speed of adaptation. Furthermore, the process of writing this resource is truly collaborative to a degree that should make any Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) professional envious. On sites like deviantART and Newgrounds, people collaborate on original art projects and animations. On MySpace, teens create their own web pages, sharing snippets of html and expressing themselves in a quintessentially teenage fashion. Blogs written by ordinary citizens have become influential in politics and culture, almost just as envisioned by science fiction writer Orson Scott Card. Peer production of content, it seems, has arrived. What has made this explosion of creativity possible is not better tools for production (though those help), but rather social contexts for sharing those products with others. The easy availability of an audience motivates people to create. In this paper, I'll review the history of peer production of content on the Internet, and present current research in the Electronic Learning Communities (ELC) Lab at Georgia Tech that aims to help support this phenomenon. Drawing on work in the fields of online community design, CSCW, and computer-supported cooperative learning, I'll discuss how we can design Internet-based environments conducive to creativity, collaboration, and learning. 0 0
Constructing text: Wiki as a toolkit for (collaborative?) learning Collaboration
Constructionism
Education
Knowledge building
Open content
Wiki
WikiSym English 2007 Writing a book from which others can learn is itself a powerful learning experience. Based on this proposition, we have launched Science Online, a wiki to support learning in high school science classrooms through the collaborative production of an online science resource. Our approach to designing educational uses of technology is based on an approach to education called constructionism, which advocates learning by working on personally meaningful projects. Our research examines the ways that constructionism connects to collective models of knowledge production and learning such as Knowledge Building. In this paper, we explore ways that collaboration using wiki tools fits into the constructionist approach, we examine learning goals for youth growing up in a read-write culture, and we discuss preliminary findings in an ongoing year-long study of Science Online in the classroom. Despite the radically open collaboration afforded by wiki, we observe that many factors conspired to stymie collaborative writing on the site. We expected to find cultural barriers to wiki adoption in schools. Unexpectedly, we are also finding that the design of the wiki tool itself contributed barriers to collaborative writing in the classroom. 0 2
From Wikipedia to the classroom: exploring online publication and learning ICLS English 2006 0 3
Becoming Wikipedian: Transformation of participation in a collaborative online encyclopedia Community
Incentive
Wikipedia
Proceedings of GROUP International Conference on Supporting Group Work, 2005. pp 1.-10. 2005 Traditional activities change in surprising ways when computermediated communication becomes a component of the activity system. In this descriptive study, we leverage two perspectives on social activity to understand the experiences of individuals who became active collaborators in Wikipedia, a prolific, cooperatively-authored online encyclopedia. Legitimate peripheral participation provides a lens for understanding participation in a community as an adaptable process that evolves over time. We use ideas from activity theory as a framework to describe our results. Finally, we describe how activity on the Wikipedia stands in striking contrast to traditional publishing and suggests a new paradigm for collaborative systems. 0 12